Share this post on your profile with a comment of your own:

Successfully Shared!

View on my Profile
Different Types of Fats: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

May 12, 2020
Medically reviewed by Susan Kerrigan, MD and Marianne Madsen

For years, the common knowledge was that fat makes you fat. Any food high in fat should be avoided and replaced with a low-fat choice. In theory, this sounds reasonable. If something contains a lot of fat, it must cause you to gain weight, right? 

 

Researchers in the 1970s believed this and started urging people to adopt low-fat or fat-free diets. Eventually, the public was convinced that fat was the enemy, and weight-loss diets low in all types of fatty foods became the norm.

 

But it’s not that simple. Back then, scientists were unable to make the distinction between different types of fat. So they simply concluded that all fats were bad and left it at that. Today, though, we know of the existence of multiple types of fats: saturated fats, monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats, and trans fats. Not all of them cause weight gain, and some are even healthy. So which ones should you include in your diet and which ones should you avoid?

Title

Next Video >>

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Explained

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Explained

Unsaturated Fat

 

First, let’s start with unsaturated fats–a type of fat considered to be healthy. The term “unsaturated fats” generally includes both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, both of which are essentially the same thing. Unsaturated fats can be found mostly in plant-based foods, such as olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, avocados, and various nuts, as well as fatty fish like salmon, sardines, and herring. They should be included in your diet as much as possible, because they provide many benefits over other types of fats. In fact, research shows that replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats can have the same effect on your heart health as cholesterol-lowering medications.

 

Saturated Fat

 

One type of fat you want to be careful around is saturated fat, which is found in red meat, cheese, and whole milk. Research on saturated fat is limited, and scientists aren’t exactly sure how it influences the body. Most recommend to keep your saturated fat intake to a minimum, just to be safe. But don’t be afraid to have a glass of milk or a steak every now and then.

Title

Next Video >>

Sources of Omega-3

Sources of Omega-3

Trans Fat

 

The last type of fat, which should be avoided entirely, is called trans fat. Trans fats are a mainly artificial substance and raise your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Once, they were common in pre-packaged baked goods and other processed foods, but today they’re completely outlawed. The FDA considers them “not safe for human consumption” and has taken steps to completely remove them from the food supply. If there’s any fat you shouldn’t go near, it’s trans fat. 

 

Based on what we know today, the bottom line is that unsaturated fats are good for you, saturated fats should be consumed in moderation, and trans fats should be cut out from your diet completely. As research on the topic progresses, we’ll know more about the different types of fats and how they affect the body in the years to come.

References

 

Related Articles

Food

How Small Diet Changes Affect Your Health

Researchers are using the Health Nutritional Index to rank foods and help people make small diet changes to improve their health.

Food

Common Food Allergies and How To Treat Them

Over 50 million Americans have a food allergy. Here are some of the most common food allergies and how to treat them.

Food

Can Nuts Improve Sexual Function?

Results from a recent study seem to suggest that including nuts in one's diet can improve sexual intensity and desire, though more research is needed.

Send this to a friend